Level 2 – Fencing Installer Apprenticeship

Role Overview

There’s much more to fence installation than you might think. A fencing installer has a lot of responsibilities. With the potential to operate in a variety of different environments, from commercial to residential, it will mean that no two days are the same. Due to the mass diversity in the industry, there are multiple opportunities available to anyone looking to start a fencing installer apprenticeship.

A fence installer does much more than placing down fencing. They are required to inspect locations and determine suitable areas to work in. They must also be able to recommend appropriate fencing materials that can be used for the build, ensuring these are all treated to withstand all weather conditions. Along with all this, a fence installer must also follow all health and safety guidelines.

Then, during the project, the installer must level out the ground the fence is being installed on. Once this has been achieved, they need to dig out the areas for the fencing to sit. To do this they use an array of tools including both handheld and/or mechanical excavators. They will then fix posts that are made from materials such as wood, vinyl and metal to the base. 

Fencing Installer Apprenticeship Overview

The fencing installer apprenticeship lasts 18 months, during which the apprentice will learn the skills and knowledge needed to kick-start their journey into the industry of fence installation. This apprenticeship standard comes with maximum funding of £8,000 and could earn the apprentice a level 2 qualification in fence installation. The EQA provider is the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. Throughout the 18 months, the apprentice will deal with a combination of practical and classroom-based learning.  

Why Apprenticeships?

As opposed to sitting in a classroom all day, a government apprenticeship offers valuable first-hand experience and skills in your desired industry. You will always be adding to your CV as the apprenticeship progresses, making you a more desirable candidate for any future roles you apply for. Whilst accruing the skills and knowledge of your industry of choice, you will also be earning a respectable wage.  

Perhaps you’re looking to further develop your skills in an industry you are currently working in. Although you may have your foot in the door you might be thinking about creating more opportunities for yourself and an apprenticeship can help you develop new skills as well as improve those you already have. Or maybe you need some further qualifications to make yourself an appropriate candidate for a promotion.  

No matter the reason, there is an apprenticeship for you. Here we take a deep dive into the Level 2 Fencing Installer apprenticeship.  

Colleagues communicating with one another on the job. Showing a skill gained through a fencing installer apprenticeship.

Skills  

The skills the apprentice will learn and develop: 

  • Communication 
  • Interpersonal 
  • Operate and control a variety of equipment/tools 
  • Customer service 
  • Quality control 
  • How to treat different materials 
  • The difference between fence components 
  • Carrying our risk assessments  
  • Follow health and safety guidelines 
  • Reading plans and briefs 

Knowledge 

The knowledge the apprentice will gain: 

  • Safety conscious behaviour  
  • Differences between materials and their pros and cons 
  • The purpose of the different types of fences 
  • Storing and handling different materials and tools 
  • Reading and interpreting measurements 
  • Treating and repairing different materials 

Behaviours 

  • Strong work ethic, making sure the best service is being provided 
  • Must be able to use their own initiative when making decisions 
  • Good time management 
  • Work sensibly and safely to comply with guidelines 
  • Must be able to work to a high standard independently and as a team 
  • Attention to detail 

Future Jobs

Some of the opportunities a fencing installer apprenticeship can lead to: 

  • Work towards a degree apprenticeship 
  • Self-employment, creating a new firm 
  • Lead installer 
  • Contract management 
  • Landscaping 
  • Construction labourer 

There are also a variety of different industries: 

  • Domestic 
  • Agricultural 
  • Commercial 
  • Security 
  • Infrastructure 

Potential Salary 

Throughout the 18 months an apprentice can expect to receive a weekly wage of anywhere from £129 – £300+ a week, depending on the hours worked and the employer. After the apprenticeship, the average salary for a starter fence installer is £18,000 a year. 

Entry Requirements 

As this is a level 2 apprenticeship, there is only one requirement that requires the applicant to be over the age of 16.  

Qualifications 

By the end of the apprenticeship, the apprentice must have both Level 1 and 2 English and Math qualifications. This will be required before entering the end-point assessment. The apprentice will also gather enough knowledge to help meet the requirements of the Fencing Industry Skill Standard/Construction Skills Certification Scheme (FISS/CSCS).  

Conclusion 

If you’re someone who loves working outdoors and always taking on new challenges then a fencing installation apprenticeship is the one for you. If you’d like to learn more about the role then click here

Perhaps you don’t quite see yourself becoming a fence installer but like the sound of working outdoors, take a look at these other engineering and manufacturing apprenticeships

Newsletter

Sign up to our newsletter to get the latest information on a variety of different apprenticeships!

Level 3 Digital Engineering Technician Apprenticeship

Image of a man and a woman looking at a digital representation of an engineering plan. Paper engineering plans on the table in front of them.

Do you have a passion to help a wider team complete complex tasks using digital techniques? If this sounds like it would suit you, read on to find out how the Level 3 Digital Engineering Technician apprenticeship could help start your new career.

Key Responsibilities of a Digital Engineering Technician Apprentice

A Digital Engineering Technician helps produce detailed solutions to achieve the best performance of built environment projects through the use of digital models and presentations produced using software, sketches and electronic visualisations. This role will help support Digital Engineers and other functional specialists in completing complex tasks using digital techniques.

Entry Requirements for the Level 3 Digital Engineering Technician Apprenticeship

What does it take to get on a digital engineering technician apprenticeship? The typical entry requirements for this apprenticeship are 5 GCSEs or equivalent, including Maths and English; or a Level 2 apprenticeship. Employers may have their own entry requirements, so it is best to check with them to see what they ask for.

Core Competencies of a Digital Engineering Technician Apprentice

The course lasts 36 months, not including the End-Point Assessment (EPA) period. During this time, you will carry out many duties that could help fulfil different core competencies which you will be assessed on. Examples of some duties include:

  • Virtualisation and simulation;
  • Digital management of design, production and management of assets;
  • Communicate complex engineering principles to stakeholders;
  • Integration of construction data and information;
  • Follow the standards and regulation of digital information.

Digital Engineering Technician Knowledge Modules

Throughout this apprenticeship, you will have the opportunity to learn whilst on the job. However, you will also have knowledge modules that will help you understand:

  • Health and safety industry regulations, and how to identify basic health and safety outputs digitally
  • Sustainability issues in projects across various aspects
  • How engineering principles, codes and standards work in built environment
  • Principles of the commercial procedures and reporting on stages of construction project
  • Quantification and costing within a digital environment
  • How design brief proposals are prepared
  • Aware of how to apply technology and the human to technology interfaces
  • The importance of project planning and resourcing
  • The quality required throughout the lifecycle
  • The construction industry and its sectors
  • Awareness of objectives set by clients and employers
  • Basic research techniques to ensure integrity of knowledge discovery

The apprenticeship will help you understand these knowledge, skills and behaviours which will help you in your future career and further qualifications if you decide to continue pursuing this career path.

Qualifications You’ll Earn from the Digital Engineering Technician Apprenticeship

Once you have completed a digital engineering technician apprenticeship, you will gain qualifications in the following:

  • English and Maths will be required to be demonstrated at Level 2;
  • BTEC Level 3 Construction and the Built Environment;
  • NVQ Level 3 Diploma in Built Environment Design.

These qualifications are equivalent to A-levels.

Female civil engineer discusses theme park attraction plans on a laptop
Photo by ThisisEngineering RAEng on Unsplash

Potential Jobs and Future Career

After completing this apprenticeship, you could progress to Construction Design Manager, Construction Quantity Surveyor, Construction Site Manager, and Civil Engineering Site Manager. Should you want to pursue a job as a Construction Design Manager, they apply similar skills that you would learn on this apprenticeship, such as commercial awareness, communication, and attention to detail. Construction Design Managers have an average salary of £25,000 to £90,000 so it is a lucrative career that you could look at developing in.

Other careers like Construction Quantity Surveyor have salaries that start from £25,000 and could go up to £80,000 at senior management levels. Similar to Construction Design Managers, this role has skills that can be applied that you will learn on the digital engineering technician apprenticeship.

The digital engineering technician apprenticeship has been designed to deliver the right competencies, knowledge and understanding to meet the requirements of Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS) or other industry affiliated schemes, so you will not be ill-equipped if you decide to continue pursuing a career in this field.

Professional Regulation

As mentioned, the knowledge, skills and behaviours from this apprenticeship are required to help achieve Technician/Associate status through the following professional institutions:

The professional review process is also included in the assessment process of the apprenticeship.

Conclusion

For someone considering a construction career, this apprenticeship is a great starting point to get the transferable skills you need to continue developing as a digital engineering technician. A Digital Engineering Technician Apprenticeship will allow you to gain qualifications which will give you a strong foothold in further qualifications and professional regulations in this sector. In addition to learning and building your skills, you will be able to earn money and work in a real work environment, equipping you with the skills needed to succeed as you develop your career.

For more information on other related apprenticeships, take a look at our posts on other apprenticeship standards:

Level 6 Project Manager Degree Apprenticeship

Group Of Businesswomen Meeting In Modern Boardroom

Do you like making a difference, enjoy seeing the results of a project from start to finish, and want the opportunity to work across a variety of industries? If so, read on to find out how the level 6 Project Management course is a great way to continue your professional development as a project manager while developing the valuable skills and management techniques to be an effective leader.

Jobs and entry criteria

The project manager apprenticeship equips apprentices with the essential knowledge and skills they can utilize in any type of industry with a career progression path of senior management roles. An average salary of £47.5k is achievable as a Project Manager but this can vary depending on the industry and employer. All the skills developed in this apprenticeship are transferable, allowing for many different opportunities and career growth.

Although the entry requirements may differ by employers, an apprentice would be expected to have the following:

  • 3 A-Levels at grades A to C or the vocational equivalent
  • International Project Association (IPMA) Level D qualification or equivalent before the endpoint assessment
  • Level 2 Maths and English

However, if you have don’t have Level 2 Maths and English you will have the opportunity to complete these before taking the End-Point Assessment (EPA).

The duration of the apprenticeship is typically four years, and you will achieve a BA or BSC Honours degree in Project Management.

Key responsibilities of a Project Manager

A Project Manager is responsible for the day-to-day management of projects, leading and managing their team. This includes the planning, organising, and monitoring of the project, ensuring they are completed on time and within budget. As a project manager, you will need to have good communication and leadership skills to work with diverse teams and motivate them to perform at their best. In addition, you will be organised and good at problem-solving. A project manager needs to be able to adapt and resolve issues promptly.

The knowledge and skills of a Project Manager

In this apprenticeship course, you will gain the key characteristics and skillset of a project manager to manage a team professionally and successfully motivate your project team members. The apprenticeship course will help you understand the following:

  • Manage project budgets and costs
  • Reporting project performance
  • Risk management 
  • Interpreting the aims and objectives of a project
  • The main UK business sectors and how they operate
  • Effective communication with internal and external stakeholders
  • Schedule management
  • Quality management
  • Setting realistic goals
  • Producing status reports
  • Develop strategic plans to achieve an organisation’s short, medium, and long-term strategies
Two businessman discussing a data analysis report

The personality traits of a project manager

A Project Manager is innovative, they understand the bigger picture and work enthusiastically with their team to develop creative and effective solutions. Most importantly, they maintain professional conduct and drive to inspire and support their project team members, working together towards their goals.

Here are the personality traits and characteristics commonly found among project managers:

  • organised
  • takes accountability and responsibility
  • proactive
  • generous with delegating tasks and credit
  • strategic
  • team building and empowering
  • open to give and receive feedback
  • Persistent when faced with tough situations

Employers especially look for these qualities in successful project managers.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Level 6 Project Manager apprenticeship is a great way to develop professionally with excellent progression opportunities. As a result of completing the course, you can become eligible to be a full member of the Association for Project Management (APM). You will gain wide recognition of your achievement in the project profession to add to your CV and unlimited access to APM learning resources and training events to further extend your knowledge.

If you would like to learn more about this apprenticeship or to apply, get in touch with us today.

Improvement Leader Apprenticeship Level 6; a Worldwide Opportunity!

Who in the World would employ you?

With the rapid growth of multinational companies and the globalisation of every countries job sector, it has never been more important to stand out from the crowd. A level 6 Improvement Leader Apprenticeship could be exactly what you need.

The UK’s biggest company (BP) which according to the Global 500 is the worlds’ 8th biggest company has the total workforce of 70,000 but only 15,000 are based in the UK. This means the most successful UK company only has 21.4% of its workforce based in the UK. This fact isn’t unique, the world’s biggest company (Walmart) the well known American supermarket chain have 700,000 of their total 2,300,000 employees working outside of America, which equates to 30.4% of their employees. So it is no longer a case of just competing with people from your town or county, you are competing against your continent and the World!

It is important to realise this mass globalisation of jobs isn’t a bad thing, in fact it is a positive. There are almost 200 countries worldwide and now you have a chance to work for any company, from any of these countries, so you are no longer limited to a job in your local town you have the ability to find the job that fits you worldwide.

What will you gain from this apprenticeship?

From this apprenticeship you will gain a level 6 qualification, which is the equivalent of a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree from University. According The Guardian Only 27.2% of UK adults aged between the age of 16-74 have a qualification of this level, so based on qualifications you will have an advantage against 72.8% of UK adults. According to the HuffPost only 6.7% of the world have a qualification of this level so you are putting yourself ahead of 93.3% of the world’s population with this qualification.

As well as earning this Improvement leader apprenticeship qualification you will gain many skills, including:

  • Improved Strategy Development: You will learn how to develop and adapt your plan and your ability to implement your plan.
  • Team Formation & Leadership: You will learn how to best form a team and the most out of each member of the team
  • Voice of Customer: Understanding and explaining to a team the thoughts of a customer
  • Process Mapping and Analysis: Improving your ability to spot new opportunities from analysis, leading to an improving cycle
  • Data Analysis: The ability to interpret data, and work out how you and your team are performing, and if there are any improvements needed
  • Project selection and scooping: Establishing guidelines for a project you have identified for your team to work on
  • Benchmarking: the ability to compare your company to rivals
A level 6 Improvement Leader Apprentice with the ability to work for any company in the world
Learn how to get the best out of every member of the team

Drive for results

You will develop your drive for both sales and customer experience, inturn inspiring your team to follow suit. As you become successful you will become more passionate in your work creating a positive loop.

Team Working

You will learn you can’t be the best in every field, it is important to create a strong team mentality. You will be responsible for improving team performance and resolving any issues.

Professionalism

You will learn to work to the highest standard, no regardless of any issues. This is desirable to both customers, company owners and members of your own team. Professionalism displays personal resilience to any challenge and shows you aren’t swayed in decision by pressure.

Strategic Thinking

Instead of just planning for today you will learn to plan for different future eventualities. This could involve:

  • Diversifying range of product for if one range becomes unpopular. For example Amazon started off selling books but now they sell groceries, host websites and create TV shows
  • Finding new tools and planning how they could help and be implemented
  • Planning new sales campaigns

Safe Working

Recognising opportunities to improve safe working conditions

An Improvement Leader Apprenticeship, delivering you to your destination
Apply for the Improvement Leader Apprenticeship now and see where in the world it could take you.

Digital Marketing: Do’s and don’ts of Facebook ads

There is few a tool more powerful in any digital marketer’s arsenal than Facebook. Despite the rise of newer social media channels, Facebook and Instagram (which are integrated on the same ads manager) remain unbeatable social media giants. 44% of the UK population have a Facebook account and 32.4% are on Instagram. That’s a lot of people to potentially reach! Therefore, a key component of digital marketing is running an engaging and impactful Facebook campaign. I’ve compiled this list of do’s and don’ts to help you make the most of Facebook and maximise your campaigns.  

Digital Marketing mobile

The do’s of digital marketing on Facebook  

DO define & refine your audience 

With almost half the UK population on Facebook, you don’t want your brand message to be lost into the ether. Instead, take time planning who you want your ad to reach and what stage of the customer lifecycle they are at (see Understanding The Customer Life Cycle). Facebook’s targeting options are the best in the digital marketing industry, so make sure you play around with narrowing your audiences based on location, age, gender, interests and language.  

DO carry out split tests  

Split testing is the simplest way of improving your campaign performance. Often referred to as A/B split tests, they allow you to change variables (e.g. creative, copy, audience) to see which variation of your ad delivers the best results. Although it may be tedious at first, split tests can boost your ROI by 10x when done properly. Best practice is to focus on a single metric to determine success of your split test and compare performance accurately.   

DO report weekly & optimise 

Campaign optimisation is a necessary step if you want to decrease costs, increase ROI and boost engagement. The easiest way to do this is to check your campaign consistently by pulling a weekly report and analysing your metrics. Is one audience segment engaging with your ad more than the other? Optimise toward them. Are one of your creatives underperforming? Turn it off and shift spend to a better performer. Facebook is incredibly competitive so optimisation is essential to compete with big brands.  

Digital marketing desktop

The dont’s of digital marketing on Facebook 

DON’T stop organic social posts  

While Facebook paid ads are a great method of driving engagements and sales, they should be seen as an addition to organic posts. When someone sees your ad, they will most likely view your other social media before they make a purchase. You should post regularly on organic channels and also use non-paid social to interact with your audience in ways that you can’t with paid ads. This maintains your brand image and builds a sense of community that paid ads cannot.  

DON’T use engagement bait  

Engagement bait is a tactic used to goad users into interacting with your post (think “share this post to win ££”). Facebook has a strict policy in place against engagement baiting and there are rules to ensure that it is not done. Not only does this deceive the customer, but it also harms your brand. The key to good digital marketing is to keep your posts authentic and then your target audience will engage with you without being goaded.  

DON’T overdo it on the copy  

It’s easy to think that because you’re paying for your ad, you want to get the most bang for your buck and fill it with copy. However, the average human attention span is only 8 seconds and on Facebook people spend an average of 1.7 seconds looking at a piece of content. Don’t waste your time writing long copy for no one to read, instead invest in your creatives. An engaging, thumb-stopping creative will be more impactful than lengthy copy.  

Conclusion  

When done correctly, paid ads on Facebook can reach your target audience and boost your ROI. Facebook and social media are always evolving so what works one week may not work the next. You should consider these do’s and don’ts as a general guideline of Facebook paid social best practice to navigate this ever-changing landscape. Now you’re ready to explore Facebook ad manager for yourself!